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Nananu Village Seawall Reconstruction Confirmed

Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama has confirmed the reconstruction of a seawall at Nananu Village in Tailevu. Speaking to village elders during his visit to the burned Lodoni Health Centre on
02 Sep 2017 11:00
Nananu Village Seawall Reconstruction Confirmed
Nananu village headman, Savenaca Nakete, 56, at the sewall built and the line of houses threatened by rising level and effects of climate change. Photo:Jone Luvenitoga

Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama has confirmed the reconstruction of a seawall at Nananu Village in Tailevu.

Speaking to village elders during his visit to the burned Lodoni Health Centre on August 29, Mr Bainimarama reassured villagers that his Government had sought assistance and the Guangdong Province of China had answered.

The Embassy of the People’s Republic of China has also released a statement confirming the assistance. The release said:  “At the request of the Fijian Government, Guangdong Province of China is considering the aid project of a seawall construction in Nananu Village to mitigate the threat posed by rising sea level to local villagers.”

“China deeply empathises with Fiji and other Pacific Island Countries on the adverse effects posed by climate change and has provided assistance, within its means, to Fiji under the framework of South-South co-operation.”

Nananu Village headman Savenaca Nakete said delegates of the embassy had visited the village earlier  and told them that preliminary feasibility study on the project had been carried out and were now awaiting  consultations from the Fiji side.

He added that they were also looking forward to the day when agreements would be signed by both parties.

A total of 18 homes constructed near the coastline are underthreat from flooding.

“Nananu Village lies a metre or two above sea level,” Mr Nakete said.

The figures, he added were indicated by engineers using the ocean horizon as bearings when elevating road levels on low lying areas during the construction of the Korovou-Natovi highway.

The 56-year-old said the current seawall was decades old and was now sinking with the coastline.

“It got worse during Tropical Cyclone Winston and plans were made for the relocation of the village when tidal waves piled rocks and mud beside the seawall.”

Since then, he added the floodwaters had continued to enter the village from one side,” Mr Nakete said.

“But relocation means more financial commitment and we don’t want to be a burden to the Government.”

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