NEWS

Climate Change About Peace, Security, Says Bainimarama

Fiji regards climate change as a peace and security issue, in the same way as its commitment to peacekeeping, says Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama. “Next year marks the 40th anniversary
17 Nov 2017 12:21
Climate Change About Peace,  Security, Says Bainimarama
Prime Minister and COP23 President Voreqe Bainimarama with United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres at the inauguration of the High Level Segments of COP23 in Bonn, Germany. Photo: DEPTFO News

Fiji regards climate change as a peace and security issue, in the same way as its commitment to peacekeeping, says Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama.

“Next year marks the 40th anniversary of Fiji’s contribution to UN peacekeeping. Our men and women in uniform have worn the blue beret with pride and distinction and will continue to do so,” he said.

“Because as a nation, service to the UN and all it stands for is an honour and is part of how we see ourselves – sending our people across the world to protect the lives of others in troubled places far from our island home.

“By any standard, we make a big contribution for a small country.”

He made the remarks at a COP23 event in Bonn, Germany.

The high level event was about Policy Coherence and Joint Delivery: UN System’s Support to Lower-Emission and Climate Resilient Development at National Level.

Mr Bainimarama said: “We need the UN system to be at its most effective to protect the interests of all UN members.

“So we want the UN system to work well. To be the best it can be at meeting the global challenge of climate change.

“This high level event asks us to focus on what the UN system can do for national development where there is both threat and opportunity. Clearly there are many UN agencies that have something to offer.

“The economic and social development of many member states – including Fiji – draws heavily on the contributions of these agencies. Whether it is in education, agriculture, health, human development, the environment, women and children or culture and heritage.

“And many of them have a mandate on climate or are delivering programmes that benefit our response to climate change.

“We also understand the vital role played by the extended family of international institutions that deal with trade, finance and economic matters – whether it is the World Bank, IMF, WTO or UNCTAD. We must have the climate change issue understood and applied to all of their activities as well.

“But, the question we have to ask ourselves is this: Is this effort integrated? Is it designed for maximum effectiveness? Are all these agencies performing at a level that is appropriate for our collective response to climate change? Can we do a better job with the resources we already have? Do we need more resources? And I think the answer to that is probably ‘yes’.”

Edited by Naisa Koroi

Feedback:  jyotip@fijisun.com.fj



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