NATION

Usumaki’s Last Military Tattoo

  Warrant Officer Class One (WO1) Josaia Usumaki has been in the Republic of Fiji Military Forces (RFMF) Band for 31 years. The RFMF Band’s 100th Anniversary Military Tattoo at
29 Nov 2017 11:00
Usumaki’s Last Military Tattoo
Warrant Officer Class One (WO1) Josaia Usumaki (right) with former RFMF Jazz Band member Ro Rabici Logavatu at the RFMF Band Office. Photo: Maika Bolatiki

 

Warrant Officer Class One (WO1) Josaia Usumaki has been in the Republic of Fiji Military Forces (RFMF) Band for 31 years. The RFMF Band’s 100th Anniversary Military Tattoo at the ANZ Stadium on December 8 will be his last.

Speaking to the Fiji SUN at the RFMF Band’s room at the Queen Elizabeth Barracks (QEB) on Monday he said that after his passing out in 1986 he joined the RFMF Band.

He said he had attended Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo, a tattoo in Australia and New Zealand.

He is a drummer and also plays trombone.

Mr Usumaki goes on leave on December 02 however he said he would be taking part in the military tattoo.

“This will be my last military tattoo as I will be retiring from the RFMF in March next year,” he said.

He said they would be playing a special number – “You Raise Me Up” as tribute to their colleagues who had passed away.

The military tattoo he said was always at night.

A tattoo is a military performance of music or display of armed forces in general. Mr Usumaki said members of the public should come in numbers to the ANZ Stadium to witness the first ever military tattoo in Fiji.

Meanwhile children from orphanages around the country will be given a special show on December 7.

Chairman of the RFMF Band Military Tattoo Centennial Celebration Commander (Navy) Lepani Vaniqi said the RFMF would put on a full dress rehearsal with all the effects for these children.

“The RFMF will bring children from St Christopher’s Home, Dilkusha Home and Veilomani Home in Ba on the eve of the Military Tattoo,” he said.

He said they would arrange for the children to be brought to the ANZ Stadium. “They will be given a special screening of the show and treated like VIPs.”

Mr Vaniqi said the RFMF Band wanted to invest into the future of the nation and one way of doing this was giving all children a chance to be part of something special.

He added the proceeds from the RFMF Band Military Tattoo will be distributed to each of the homes as well.

According to Wikipedia, the term tattoo comes from the early 17th century Dutch phrase doe den tap toe (“turn off the tap”), a signal sounded by drummers or trumpeters to instruct innkeepers near military garrisons to stop serving beer and for soldiers to return to their barracks.”

Edited by Mohammed Zulfikar

Feedback:  maikab@fijisun.com.fj



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