NEWS

‘Healing Water’ Continues to Draw Visitors from Abroad

Villagers of Delakado and Natadradave believe the manna surrounding the “miraculous healing” water of Dawasamu, Tailevu may still be alive if one ‘believes’. For Jack Singh, 69, of Sydney, Australia
28 Dec 2017 11:00
‘Healing Water’ Continues to Draw Visitors from Abroad
Menausi Druguvale and his nephew Neori at the “healing” pond at Natadradave Village in Tailevu on December 27, 2017. Photo: Ronald Kumar.

Villagers of Delakado and Natadradave believe the manna surrounding the “miraculous healing” water of Dawasamu, Tailevu may still be alive if one ‘believes’.

For Jack Singh, 69, of Sydney, Australia this was true.

Mr Singh said he had bathed in the “healing” water more than three times since he came to the area in 2016 and since then he continued to visit the site to heal a skin disease he needed to get rid of.

“I had a skin problem and it is all clean now. It all has to do with believing and faith and for me it was from above.

“Many people who have come here (Dawasamu), return saying they have not felt anything nor received any ‘healing’, but for me I came once and returned home with my skin clear,” Mr Singh said.

Mr Singh, who was at the site with his family, said he would visit the area again and would not stop believing the “healing” he received.

Caretaker and a clan member from the Qase ni Ratu Dawasamu; Menausi Druguvale explained that they continue to receive a number of people from overseas who hope to receive miracles from the “healing” water.

Delakado is a five-minute drive up the road from Natadradrave Village which was the original source where water flows to Okanasei Creek near Natadradave.

Mr Druguvale said there have been a number of allegations which they’ve heard from visitors and they wanted to correct this.

“People who use this water and come to the site do not have to pay anything.

“People need to have faith. If you don’t have faith to bathe here and be healed then they might as well not come.

“You must believe in God because God is the reason we have this ‘healing’ water for the people.”

He said visitors from abroad had asked him if there was a ‘snake god’ who was working miraculously in the area in which he said there was no such thing.

“It was on Facebook and people have said the ‘manna’ is now lost, but this is not true. It has to do with faith; faith in God.”

He claims that those who suffered from strokes, paralysis and other diseases had been healed from the miracle water.


According to a research conducted by the University of the South Pacific the following were made:

Turaga ni Vanua of Natadradave Village, Waisake Laulaba, the “healing” water was first discovered in March last year after Tropical Cyclone Winston when a boy suffering from a hernia was healed by bathing in the water.

Main water source from Nokoroni (ancient ancestral site) where the Okanasei Creek for Natadradave flows from and visitors bathe and receive massagers from this area and also collect personal water consumption.

Okanasei is owned by the Mataqali Naboro in Delakado.

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