NATION

Thomson Says Recovery Of Our Coral Reefs After Winston Strong

Fiji’s very own Peter Thomson is happy that our coral reefs have recovered well after the devastation caused by Tropical Cyclone Winston in February 2016. The United Nations Special Envoy
22 Jan 2018 11:00
Thomson Says Recovery Of Our  Coral Reefs After Winston Strong
From left: Prime Minister and COP23 president Voreqe Bainimarama, Tui Macuata Ratu Wiliame Katonivere, and United Nations special envoy for oceans Peter Thomson during the global launch of the International Year of the Reef at Nukubati Island in Macuata on January 17, 2018. Photo: Shratika Naidu

Fiji’s very own Peter Thomson is happy that our coral reefs have recovered well after the devastation caused by Tropical Cyclone Winston in February 2016.

The United Nations Special Envoy for Oceans said during his recent visit to Nukubati Island in Macuata, Vanua Levu: “I am very pleased to see the recovery of coral is very strong. Very vibrant lives out there on the reef not just coral life but also fishes are in good shape.

As far as the country’s coastal ecosystem is concerned, Mr Thomson said it was vital to our future generation. “And that means the mangroves and coral reefs have to be protected,” he said.

“We have to stop pollution getting out to the reefs.

“So that they are always healthy and will always provide beautiful things for the tourists to visit as a natural attraction of Fiji and also to sustain food situation by keeping the biodiversity of Fiji’s marine life healthy and that depends on the mangroves and the reefs.

“Globally the reefs are in trouble and up to 20 per cent of reefs have been destroyed.”

He said the figures may vary and many scientists have predicted that if we don’t take serious action to protect the reefs then we could lose all of it.

“It is based on good science on what is happening with sea warming and acidification but if we take measures to stop such things to protect our reefs I am sure we can save our reefs,” Mr Thomson said.

He said we can save our coral by taking necessary measures.

“Necessary measures is like half of the globe works on climate change and the other half is local measures like controlling pollution coming off from the land, controlling dangerous fishing practices and so on,” he said.

“For the people of Fiji the good news is that you are in one of the more resilient areas for coral but we can’t take things for granted.

“The rising water temperatures and the ocean acidification are real problems for coral. But with good practices here in Fiji we will always have beautiful reefs like the Great Sea Reef.”

Edited by Naisa Koroi

Feedback:  shratikan@fijisun.com.fj

Subscribe to E-Edition
pacific island top up
Air Nuigini
Subscribe-to-Newspaper
Fiji Sun Instagram
Fiji Plus
Subscribe-to-Newspaper
error: