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USP to identify training needs with ministry: Armstrong

“And one of the messages that I have taken out today is the importance of having more involvement from the ministry and advising the university on the curriculum development,” said
31 Jan 2018 11:00
USP to identify training needs with ministry: Armstrong
USP’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Derrick Armstrong. Photo: Lusiana Tuimasala

“And one of the messages that I have taken out today is the importance of having more involvement from the ministry and advising the university on the curriculum development,” said Assistant Vice-Chancellor Professor Derrick Armstrong

The University of the South Pacific’s School of Marine Studies will continue to work with the Ministry of Fisheries in identifying specific training needs.

USP’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Professor Derrick Armstrong, made this comment during the second day of JICA – USP School of Marine Studies Joint Symposium on Future International Cooperation and Human Resource Development in Marine Science and Fisheries at the University of the South Pacific in Suva.

“In this symposium we’ve explored some of the existing work we have been involved in and also the future needs of the countries particularly Fiji.

He said it was a very important for the symposium on fisheries and marine science.

“The importance of going forward have continued to work with the Ministry of Fisheries very closely in identifying specific training needs,” he said.

He said enhancing curriculum in particular areas of studies was very important.

“And one of the messages that I have taken out today is the importance of having more involvement from the Ministry and advising the university on the curriculum development in the particular areas which is very important,” he said.

“It is something that we will continue to build and to ensure that the ministry’s voice and the curriculum needs of the industry are being heard and we are being responsive to the resource capacity building needs.”

He said the School of Marine Studies had a strong relationship with the ministry and many of their graduates are working for the Ministry and the industry.

Director Fisheries Aisake Batibasaga said: “One of our objectives from this symposium is to see how we can help improve curriculum in aquaculture, fisheries management or fisheries management control surveillance to improve our coastal fisheries management and status.”

Mr Batibasaga said they wanted aquaculture to be improved for their production system.

He said the two-day symposium was the way to go forward.

“This is a good way to partnership and collaboration with other Pacific Island countries and to link to our bigger brothers who have the technology, funding, and the resources and technical capacity to help us,” Mr Batibasaga said.

Edited by Rusiate Mataika

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