NEWS

263 Million Children Globally Out of School

Globally about 263 million children and youth are out of school and this includes 61 million children who should be in primary school, aged from about 6 to 11 years.
20 Feb 2018 12:43
263 Million Children Globally Out of School
The Secretary-General of the Commonwealth Baroness Patricia Scotland at the Sheraton Fiji Resort, Denarau on February 19, 2018. Photo: DEPTFO News

Globally about 263 million children and youth are out of school and this includes 61 million children who should be in primary school, aged from about 6 to 11 years.

The comments were made at the opening of the 20CCEM Integrated Partners’ Forum by the  Secretary-General of the Commonwealth, Baroness Patricia Scotland QC at the Sheraton Fiji Resort yesterday.

“A recent UNICEF study covering nearly 100 countries over the 50-year period 1960 to 2010 shows that countries with greater education inequalities between groups have substantially higher risk of conflict,” Baroness Scotland said.

“Whereas greater equality, between male and female, decreases the likelihood of conflict, by as much as 37 percent.”   

“Girls are more likely than boys to remain completely excluded from education, despite the efforts and progress made over the past two decades.

“Three Commonwealth countries – with a combined figure of 17.2 million out-of-school children – are home to more than one third of these 61 million of out-of-school children.

“If we reduce the number of out-of-school children in Commonwealth countries, we make a very substantial impact on global figures.”

“One out-of-school adolescent is one too many.

“Sixty million young adolescents of lower secondary school age (about 12 to 14 years), and 142 million youth of upper secondary school age (about 15 to 17 years) who are reckoned to be out of school globally – are ticking time bombs.

“At risk young people can become disillusioned and lose hope in the economic and political systems and processes of a society.”

She said the longer they were unemployed, the greater the risk that they became unemployable – essentially because of the ill match between their skills and the demand of the labour market.

Edited by George Kulamaiwasa

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