NATION

Mum Relives Challenges, Emotions

When Akosita Moqe was in­formed that her son was suffering from Down Syn­drome at birth she didn’t accept it at first. She was emotional when she de­scribed the challenges she
22 Mar 2018 11:00
Mum Relives Challenges, Emotions
Akosita Moqe with her son Vilikesa Raivukica Moqe at Labasa Special Education School yesterday. Photo: WATI TALEBULA

When Akosita Moqe was in­formed that her son was suffering from Down Syn­drome at birth she didn’t accept it at first.

She was emotional when she de­scribed the challenges she and her family went through, but was thankful that her son was well.

Ms Moce was speaking at celebra­tions to mark World Down Syn­drome Day at Labasa Special Edu­cation School yesterday. The theme for this year’s celebration was ‘What I bring to the Workplace’.

Early this month the Disability Bill was passed. The bill is a guid­ing principle that protects and safe­guards any issues relating to people with disabilities.

Down syndrome (DS or DNS), also known as trisomy 21, is a genetic disorder typically associated with physical growth delays, charac­teristic facial features and mild to moderate intellectual disability.

The mother-of-four from Na­sarawaqa Village in Bua recalled when she was told about her son’s condition.

“When my son was born the nurs­es asked me if my husband was Chinese because of my son’s eyes and I told them that my husband was iTaukei.

“They then informed me that my son was suffering from Down Syn­drome,” Ms Moqe said.

“I didn’t take science when I was in high school so I didn’t know about it. I asked them what it was or how my son got it.

“They informed me what it was and how he would have physical growth delay and all other charac­teristics associated with it.

“I was emotional when I was in­formed about the characteristics. I knew I have to be strong for the sake of my son. He is my second child. I love him like I love my other three children.”

Ms Moqe said despite her son’s condition he was special.

“My son can be naughty, but out of all my children he is someone who always shares what he has and is kind. I don’t treat my son differ­ently,” she said.

“My son is six years old now and is attending Labasa Special Educa­tion School and I am glad that this school exists. When I talk to my son I bring myself to his level so that he can understand me.

“Despite the challenges we face I am glad that he is my son and would never change it for anything or anyone in this world.”

Edited by Epineri Vula

Feedback: wati.talebula@fijisun.com.fj

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