NATION

Canberra Times Impressed By Fiji Sun Circulation

Selita Bolanavanua is the Deputy Managing Editor News of the Fiji Sun. She is in Australia on a media studies programme organised by the Australian High Commission’s. Department of Foreign
22 Sep 2018 10:00
Canberra Times Impressed By Fiji Sun Circulation
Fiji Sun deputy managing editor news, Selita Bolanavanua with the managing editor of the Canberra Times, John-Paul Moloney

Selita Bolanavanua is the Deputy Managing Editor News of the Fiji Sun. She is in Australia on a media studies programme organised by the Australian High Commission’s. Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. This week she was on an internship programme with the Canberra Times in Canberra and ABC News in Sydney.

Journalists of a newspaper in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) were impressed to learn that the Fiji Sun has a larger circulation than theirs.

I met up with John-Paul Moloney and his editorial team during my visit to Canberra, thanks to a media studies programme organised by the Australian High Commission, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

The managing editor of the Canberra Times, John-Paul Moloney took me through the process of the editorial team’s day-to-day routine. Here, I also learnt that the newspaper was established in 1926 by Thomas Shakespeare.

Mr Moloney was impressed with the Fiji Sun circulation and its readership.

His editorial team were surprised that the Fiji Sun prints more copies than theirs.

Canberra Times prints up to 20,000 copies a day.

He highlighted how The Canberra Times was restructured in 2016, the paper moved from a broadsheet format to a tabloid.

I had the opportunity to sit with the editors during their midday meeting and a tour of their printing room.

Today, Canberra Times has about 20 reporters.

Visit to ABC and meeting Carmen Smith

In Sydney, I visited the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) office and met with Carmen Smith, the producer and director of Panguna, a documentary that unlocks her parents’ story.

It’s a story that is close to her heart.

The documentary was uploaded on YouTube on September 19, which since yesterday garnered 2,658 views and 81 shares.

Back in the 80s her parents met in Bougainville in Papua New Guinea. Her father Ian Smith, an Australian man fell in love with her mother Veronica Smith, a PNG woman.

Her father worked at the Panguna mine and while they were starting a family, the civil war started and forced her parents to make a decision on whether to stay or leave PNG and start a new life in Australia.

“My mum and dad kept this time in their lives very close to their hearts as I assume it does bring up some painful memories,” Ms Smith said.

“This story is close to my heart and it gave me an opportunity to see how much my mother has sacrificed for me to be where I am today.

“It also gave me more of an understanding about how my family came to be.

“And it gave my mum a platform to tell her story and let people understand a very difficult time in her life.

“I’ve learnt that my mother is a very strong person. I’ve also learnt that I get most of my strong qualities from her.

“She’s always instilled in me to be a strong woman and this documentary solidified that for me.”

The documentary of about seven minutes highlighted how Mrs Smith was at first not accepted into her husband’s family because of her nationality and colour.

Feedback: selita.bolanavanua@fijisun.com.fj

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