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Pacific Agrees On 50 Percent Reduction On Shipping Emissions By 2050

  There is a need for increased research in the use of renewable energy in shipping, zero carbon fuels and development of better efficiency ship designs. Pacific Islands Development Forum
24 Oct 2018 10:00
Pacific Agrees On 50 Percent Reduction On Shipping Emissions By 2050
Reduction of ship emmision.

 

There is a need for increased research in the use of renewable energy in shipping, zero carbon fuels and development of better efficiency ship designs.

Pacific Islands Development Forum Secretary General François Martel made the comment during the 72nd Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC72) talanoa session of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) in Suva in June.

“While the meeting was a success by the IMO and its members; in a nutshell, after lots of deliberations and posturing, the meeting agreed to reduce shipping emissions by at least 50 per cent by 2050 compared to 2008 levels,” Mr Martel said.

The Pacific countries with other climate ambitious nations had wanted a 70 – 100 per cent reduction by 2050.

“This outcome, though less ambitious than what the Pacific would have liked, and what we need to save our Pacific peoples and their livelihoods, is a step in the right direction,” he said.

“It sends a signal to the industry that they need to make the changes necessary to move the maritime shipping sector towards eventual zero emissions.

“There is therefore a need for increased research in the use of renewable energy in shipping and zero carbon fuels and development of better efficiency ship designs.

Many actors from within the industry has in the past supported ambitious reductions in light that the technology is already there to make thing happen.

According to Mr Martel it is important that the industry starts shifting to and incorporating technologies to allow for gradual adjustment, rather than a rapid adjustment at a later point in time which would certainly be more disruptive for the shipping industry.

“Pacific people need the IMO to set more ambitious targets for the Initial Strategy for reduction of Green House Gas (GHG) emissions in the international maritime transport sector.

“They should not accept anything less than what the world is required to do to meet targets set in the Paris Agreement.

“However the agreement left a window open for the target to be adjusted according to the scientific information available, so it remains in line with the Paris Agreement.”

The talanoa comprised of presentations by four eminent shipping emissions professionals who have been instrumental in guiding Pacific delegations leading up to and during discussions at the IMO.

The meeting was attended by 29 representatives from the European Union (Pacific), New Zealand High Commission, Government agencies, PDIF, Climate Change Mitigation Group, World Food Programme (Pacific) and USP.

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