NATION

Sale Of Barn Owl Worries Animals Fiji

Founder believes more action needed on public engagement, law enforcement for endangered animals.   The co-founder and managing trustee of Animals Fiji is calling for more public engagement to follow
01 Nov 2018 10:00
Sale Of Barn Owl Worries Animals Fiji
Animals Fiji Veterinarian Dr. Jorgen Petersen with the Common Barn-owl Photo: Animals Fiji

Founder believes more action needed on public engagement, law enforcement for endangered animals.

 

The co-founder and managing trustee of Animals Fiji is calling for more public engagement to follow the law and enforcement of laws concerning endangered animals.

Casey Quimby raised this concern after a Facebook status on ‘Buy and Sell in Fiji’ was found selling a Barn Owl for $1000 by a Fijian.

“There are also laws protecting animals, Protection of Animals Act, and although they are dated, they are still in place,” Ms Quimby said.

“But the public are not as aware of them and their enforcement penalties are dated and not penalties enough to deter.”

She said the owl was brought to Animals Fiji, they were going to rehabilitate and release it back to the wild, just as they had done with other owls.

The Common Barn-owl as listed in the  Convention of International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) category II states: “Appendix II lists species that are not necessarily now threatened with extinction but that may become so unless trade is closely controlled. It also includes so-called “look-alike species”, i.e. species whose specimens in trade look like those of species listed for conservation reasons.

“International trade in specimens of Appendix-II species may be authorized by the granting of an export permit or re-export certificate. No import permit is necessary for these species under CITES (although a permit is needed in some countries that have taken stricter measures than CITES requires). Permits or certificates should only be granted if the relevant authorities are satisfied that certain conditions are met, above all that trade will not be detrimental to the survival of the species in the wild.”

Ms Quimby said the public should contact Animals Fiji if they spot injured animals.

“Depending on the animal it should or shouldn’t be moved by a member of the public,” she said.

“So, it is best to ring us first to find out what to do and what is best for the animal. Our Veterinarians will then be able to give advice to the best of their acquired knowledge and work with the members of the public to come up with a path to recovery if possible.”

Ms Quimby recommends that should a member of the public have information on selling or owning of wildlife they are to report it to the Police and the Ministry of Environment.

She said Animals Fiji worked with other animal welfare organisations in the country to develop a coalition association to ensure animal welfare was lobbied to the Government and the public as a united voice. Anyone interested can send their queries to info@animalsfiji.org.

Edited by Naisa Koroi

Feedback:  sheenam.chandra@fijisun.com.fj

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