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15-Year-Old Artist Explains ‘Two in Three’ Symbolism

Fifteen-year-old Hefrani Barnes has unveiled one of her most emphatic creations, in line with the launch of the Pacific Partnership to End Violence Against Women and Girls. The unveiling of
28 Nov 2018 11:00
15-Year-Old Artist Explains ‘Two in Three’ Symbolism
Hefrani Barnes with her painting called ‘Two in Three’ at the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat in Suva

Fifteen-year-old Hefrani Barnes has unveiled one of her most emphatic creations, in line with the launch of the Pacific Partnership to End Violence Against Women and Girls.

The unveiling of her painting, which took place at the Pa­cific Islands Forum Secretariat in Suva on Monday, called for symbolic action to address domestic violence and mem­bers from the European Union Delegation for the Pacific, the UN Women Asia-Pacific and several others pledged their commitment to the cause.

The name of the painting is ‘Two in Three’ which outlines the fact that two in three women are impacted by domestic violence in the Pacific. This was a statistic highlighted by the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat.

The International Secondary School Suva student’s am­bition in life is to expand art in Fiji.

“I am inspired by the Pacific,” she said.

“I really love the Pacific culture, the colours and I like to celebrate that through my paintings. I hope to be able to represent Fiji through my art.”

Her artistic piece was covered within the ribbons, which were opened to reveal the painting inside.

“The ribbons in the art represent the cultural acceptance which hides the violence that takes place in our homes This Pacific Partnership represents what it will take to reveal the situation and address violence against women and girls.”

She added that after the ribbons were removed, the paint­ing inside showed the girl smiling because the abuser no longer had control over her.

“Where the abuser’s hand is, the colours are fading which shows he is losing power over her. The tattoos on the girl’s body reflect her story and claim back her body as the bruises fade away,” Hefrani said.

She hopes her art empowers women to believe in hope.

The Pacific Partnership to end violence against women brings together governments, civil society organisations, communities and other partners to promote gender equal­ity, prevent violence against women and girls and increase access to quality response services for survivors.

The €19.5m (FJ$46.86m) programme is being primarily funded by the European Union with targeted support from the Australian Government and cost-sharing from UN Women.

Edited by Ranoba Baoa

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