NEWS

Sunset Clause ‘About Adapting To Change’

Parliamentarians have been told that the so-called Sunset Clause was not about eliminating people, but about making sure that we adapt to changes that exist in our society. The comment
01 Dec 2018 10:12
Sunset Clause ‘About Adapting To Change’
Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Disaster Management and Meteorological Services Jone Usamate outside the parliament house on November 30, 2018. Photo: Simione Haravanua

Parliamentarians have been told that the so-called Sunset Clause was not about eliminating people, but about making sure that we adapt to changes that exist in our society.

The comment was made by Minister for Infrastructure, Transport, Disaster Management and Meteorological Services Jone Usamate while delivering his speech in Parliament yesterday.

He reminded MPs about the importance of making sure that everything they uttered in Parliament was based on facts.

Responding to comments by the Opposition Member Niko Nawaikula on the Sunset Clause, Mr Usamate said: “Niko Nawaikula keeps talking about the issue of Sunset Clause as if it was some big boogie man or something.

“We have sunset clauses in everything that we do in our lives,” he said.

Mr Usamate added that things have been changing and “we change in order to make sure they are compatible with the environment in which we live in”.

In public policy, a sunset provision or clause is a measure within a statute, regulation or other law that provides that the law shall cease to have effect after a specific date, unless further legislative action is taken to extend the law.

OTHER ISSUES:

  • Failure to mention the confederacies during the veiqaraqaravi vakavanua (traditional ceremonies of welcome) for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. Mr Usamate said he had the utmost respect for Ro Teimumu Kepa in her traditional status as a paramount chief in Fiji, but her mentioning that it was the Government of Fiji that decided that it should not mention the confederacy at all “was an utter lie”. He said that the  Ministry of iTaukei Affairs has confirmed that they had asked the people of Vuda to perform the traditional ceremony and there was no directive given to them, not to mention the traditional confederacy. “When the Ministry of iTaukei affairs briefs the different parts of Fiji on handling these traditional ceremonies, they don’t tell them exactly what to do, they explain the purpose of it.”
  • Village Bylaws: Mr Usamate said some people had been talking about the Government wanting to force the implementation of these laws. He said it was not true and all that was happening was consultations.

Edited by Epineri Vula

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