NATION

From Engineer to Glass Blowing Artist

A local artist never thought he would leave his engi­neering job and settle for his new-found hobby and profes­sion – glass blowing. Pita Vibose, who is probably the first iTaukei
18 Dec 2018 11:00
From Engineer to Glass Blowing Artist
Pita Vibose, showcased his tanoa glass pieces during Arts Exhibition at Rhum-Ba Restaurant at Denarau Marina in Nadi on December 14, 2018. Photo: Mereleki Nai.

A local artist never thought he would leave his engi­neering job and settle for his new-found hobby and profes­sion – glass blowing.

Pita Vibose, who is probably the first iTaukei glass blowing art­ist, was introduced to the art by a friend of another artist and Hot Glass Fiji Studio director, Alice Hill.

Mr Vibose, 26, had on display last week at the Rhum-Ba Restaurant at Port Denarau Marina in Nadi some of his best art works.

The Korotogo, Nadroga native was one of the artists at the ‘Born From Fire’ exhibition.

Hot Glass Fiji Studio is based in Korotogo, Nadroga.

Vibose’s story:

Mr Vibose said: “A friend of Alice Hill recommended me for the job and when I started I was amazed by what was happening around the studio, blowing glasses. I had never seen a glass being blown before.

“When I was asked to be an as­sistant I had to make a good choice to take up glass blowing instead of engineering. Actually, I started as an engineer working in big ships. First it was a hard for me to let go of engineering and take up glass blower as a permanent profession.

“I travelled abroad and visited bigger studios in New Zealand and that’s where I broadened my knowledge. Most of the pieces in this exhibition are made with the assistance of Samu and Laisa, but the bigger pieces are actually made by teaming up with Alice.

“Glass blowing is something very rare here, but I am requesting the visitors and even guests just to come and see how glass are blown here in Fiji.

“I am fortunate to be the first iTaukei glass blower and I am thankful that I was being offered this job. Most of the pieces you see here are inspired by the colours of Fiji – the ocean, the forest. We don’t make all the production, but we have a range of work with Laisa.

“Our works are also inspired by the Fijian clay pots.

“The inspiration on glass is the same colour as burn clay. It is not about blowing, it is about fin­ishing off and trying to get an idea to become the three-dimensional art that is be­ing displayed in this exhi­bition.

“Tanoa is an art that we do and it is inspired by tradition and modern, applying them togeth­er. Glass is a modern thing today and the wooden kava bowl base is traditional so it brings an outcome of glass tanoa,” he added.

Ms Hill, during the exhibition din­ner organised by Rhum-Ba, told guests about their work, their creations and inspira­tions behind the art.

She also thanked the guests who made the effort to attend the exhibition and view their art works.

The three-days art exhibition, which started last Thursday, end­ed on Sunday.

Edited by Naisa Koroi

Feedback: mereliki.nai@fijisun.com.fj

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