NATION

Lairo Doctor Touts Commercial Idea

Mosese Kuma is a self-proclaimed “lairo” (crab) doctor by profession. The 59-year-old is from Nukuni in Ono-i-Lau. Mr Kuma has been mud crab farming for two decades now. A team
20 Jan 2019 14:55
Lairo Doctor Touts Commercial Idea
Mosese Kuma with his mud crabs in Nadawa on January 19, 2019. Photo: Sheenam Chandra

Mosese Kuma is a self-proclaimed “lairo” (crab) doctor by profession.

The 59-year-old is from Nukuni in Ono-i-Lau.

Mr Kuma has been mud crab farming for two decades now.

A team from the Fiji Sun met Mr Kuma when he arrived in Suva to bring “lairo” for his family.

“This is my third trip to Suva to bring lairo for my family,” said Mr Kuma.

“I have brought two cages so the first one is for my family and the other one is for reproduction.

“I am going to take the second cage of mud crabs somewhere where the female mud crabs can lay their eggs.”

He is very fond of his mud crabs and takes good care of their dietary requirement and personal hygiene.

“My lairo are very clean and I feed them watermelon, cucumber, lettuce, cabbage and pandanus fruit,” said Mr Kuma.

“They also require water every day to clean themselves and it’s very hygienic when you compare it with rearing other animals such as chicken and ducks.

“I feed my mud crabs fruits and vegetables so that the meat can be sweet and full of fat.

“I reckon once you eat this type of mud crab, you will not want to eat any other type of meat.”

He has spent nearly half of his life with his mud crabs and claims that he is now a lairo doctor.

“I know everything from their spawning period to feeding habits and habitats, reproduction and lifecycle so basically I am a lairo doctor,” said Mr Kuma.

“I would encourage this farming because it is a very good business idea for people in the maritime areas.

“This is a sustainable means of readily available food. It is a very hygienic rearing method because water is used every day so it does not smell.”

He said the idea to do lairo farming came to him one day and with God’s guidance, he was able to make his idea work.

“When I failed, I never lost hope and I kept on continuing. From that stage I have learnt more. God has helped me create a vision and given me power to accomplish my goals. I have not seen anybody farming lairo.”

He reveals there are plans of a partnership to commercialise his business and in the future, he plans to separate the male and female mud crabs to make rearing easier.

Edited by Epineri Vula

Feedback:  sheenam.chandra@fijisun.com.fj

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