NEWS

Police Inspector Turns Midwife As Baby Born In Taxi

A Police officer controlling traffic at Natabua junction in Lautoka jumped into action when he noticed that a taxi carrying a pregnant woman was stuck in traffic, with the woman on the verge of giving birth.
01 Feb 2019 10:32
Police Inspector Turns Midwife As Baby Born In Taxi
Special Inspector of Police Penijamini (Ben) Vukivou with the newborn baby.

A Police officer controlling traffic at Natabua junction in Lautoka jumped into action when he noticed that a taxi carrying a pregnant woman was stuck in traffic, with the woman on the verge of giving birth.

The 30-year-old mother Viniana Tudia yesterday thanked Special Inspector of Police Penijamini (Ben) Vukivou, who got into the taxi with Mrs Tudia and helped the taxi driver to clear traffic and rush to the hospital.

And, when Mrs Tudia gave birth in the taxi, Inspector Vukivou took on the role of a midwife and helped her safely deliver the 3.7 kilogram baby boy in the vehicle.

This is Mrs Tudia’s fourth child and by far the most adventurous way she has given birth.

She shared her story with the Fiji Sun: “It was a normal day in Nadi and I did not expect the baby to be delivered that day. I did the normal preparation for my daughter’s school lunch and made her get onto the bus.

“I was on my way to beat my dad’s place in Lautoka since I felt the contraction but it was far apart. I thought I would give birth on Friday or Saturday.”

Mrs Tudia left her Saweni, Votualevu home in Nadi and felt the onset of labour at Saweni at around 7.30am but the vehicle got stuck in traffic.

“When I reached Lomolomo the pain was unavoidable. It was going through and through.”

It was then that Inspector Vukivou saw the mother in labour when the taxi stopped next to him.

On the way to the hospital, Mrs Tudia’s baby bag broke, prompting Inspector Vukivou to ask the driver to go as quickly as he could, while the officer waved at oncoming traffic to make way.

Mrs Tudia said she knew she would deliver the baby in the taxi.

Inspector Vukivou talked her through her breathing, instructed her when to take deep breaths and to push.

“With that ordeal going through everyone kept calm. No one panicked. I told them that my water broke. And all fell into the right place. I gave a push and the baby came out right into my hand,” Mrs Tudia said.

“From that moment on they did what they could to reach the hospital in time for the medical team to cut the umbilical cord.”

Mother and son, named Emori Tudia after her grandfather, are well.

Screenshot 2019-02-01 at 11.43.36 AM

 

Inspector Vukivou has been in the Fiji Police Force for the past 10 years and he described the moment as something extraordinary.

“It was a different experience from community policing,” he said.

“I am satisfied with my role as what I did as a police officer and to act in that situation to save someone’s life and if I delayed it could have been a different story.”

Edited by Epineri Vula

Feedback: waisean@fijisun.com.fj

Fijisun E-edition
Tanoa Waterfront Lautoka Fiji
Subscribe-to-Newspaper
Fiji Sun Instagram
Fiji Plus
Subscribe-to-Newspaper
error: