Analysis

6 Real Issues That Curse Our Development

Old hand-me-down items might have been considered satanic and not in harmony with Christian values and beliefs. They were connected to witchcraft and the occult. Because of them those involved in the burning of the items believed that the villagers were cursed and prevented from succeeding in life.
04 Mar 2019 15:47
6 Real Issues That Curse Our Development
Artefacts used in rituals associated with witchcraft collected at Namoli Village included tanoa (yaqona bowls), tabua (whales teeth), and buli (cowrie shell).

The overwhelming response to My Say last week on the burning of traditional artefacts at Namoli Village, Lautoka, to lift a curse clearly showed the diversity of opinions.

While we respect religious freedom that churches enjoy there is concern about its ultimate impact on people’s outlook about life.

A number of Christian churches had been asked to respond on the issues, but only the Catholic Church through its leader, Archbishop Peter Long Choy, replied. His response is similar to widely-held opinions that the responsibility of raising successful children lies on the family or homes, principally the parents or guardians. We cannot blame our current problems or failures on a curse or a past.

It is common knowledge that before the arrival of Christianity to our shores Fijian ancestors worshipped mythical gods. They built temples “burekalou” (house of God) for this purpose. They somehow knew of a supreme being, but had limited knowledge. The lack of information gave rise to the worship of a number of mythical gods. It became a source of strength, power, wealth and sexual prowess. Christianity described it as idol worship and an abomination to the sight of God, the supreme being.

Some Fiji Sun readers, including Opposition leader Sitiveni Rabuka, said the Namoli incident could have been linked to pre-Christianity era cultural practices.

Old hand-me-down items might have been considered satanic and not in harmony with Christian values and beliefs. They were connected to witchcraft and the occult. Because of them those involved in the burning of the items believed that the villagers were cursed and prevented from succeeding in life.

Items that were burnt at the village in the presence of representatives of all the Christian denominations in the district of Vitogo.

Items that were burnt at the village in the presence of representatives of all the Christian denominations in the district of Vitogo.

However, many people who responded disagreed and I concur with their reasons, here’s a sample:

1) We cannot blame the past, our ancestors and even a curse on our weaknesses and failures. We are not forced to do anything. We have a choice. We face the consequences of our choices. In a way we have the freedom to choose. Once we make that choice we cannot avoid or escape the consequences. That’s divine law and everyone is bound by it whether we like it or not: Failure should not be seen as the end game. Whenever we fail we try again until we achieve our goal. The light bulb was invented after 999 failed experiments. The inventor, Thomas Edison, told his assistant who questioned why they were persisting when they had failed 999 times. Edison said they had found out 999 ways that would not work.

2) Excessive consumption of kava, which is linked to witchcraft. Sister problems are alcohol consumption and illicit drugs which are keeping our Police busy. All these influences are the real curse on our people.

They cause health and family problems. We often hear of men and women who fail to fulfill their responsibilities at home because of overindulgence.

3) Concept of time management is not understood or lost. Late-night kava drinkers struggle to get up in the morning and start work, whether in the villages or in the urban centres. It affects overall productivity.

4) When children are taught well at home chances are they will succeed irrespective of their personal circumstances.

5) Many parents in villages may not understand that smartphones can also become the demon in the family if their use is not monitored or supervised closely. There are many good uses of smartphones, but also there are bad ones too. Currently in NZ parents have been warned to keep their children away from a game promoting suicide,

6) Last, but not least, many things don’t come free or just happen. It is fine to believe in God. But if we do not cultivate that relationship with God by following his commandments and do the right things then we face challenges. We need to be self-reliant in secular and religious knowledge. Knowledge will lead to the power of discernment – knowing what is good and bad. That will lead to wise choices and actions.

In the end we will all be held accountable for our individual choices and actions.

Feedbacknemani.delaibatiki@fijisun.com.fj

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