Sunvoice

Development Tied To Safeguarding Environment

While development of tourist attractions, including major resorts, may mean huge investments into the country which then has a multiplier effect, the effect on the environment could prove disastrous if not monitored.
05 Mar 2019 15:02
Development Tied To Safeguarding Environment
(From left- right) Minister for Forestry Osea Naiqamu and President Major-General (Ret'd) Jioji Konrote planting Masiratu Degeneria vitiensi plant at the State house on January 8, 2018. The Masiratu plant is also known as vavaloa and yaraqele, is the oldest Genera, that is endemic to Fiji and is common along areas for altitude of Viti Levu, Vanua Levu and Taveuni. Photo: WATI TALEBULA

It may seem unlikely, but the recent burning of traditional Fijian artefacts raises questions.
It was interesting to note that items that were burnt were synonymous with Fijian culture and tradition and which continued to keep this same tradition alive and well in Fiji through the decades.

This included the revered tabua (whale’s tooth), which is used at functions or funerals or for settling differences, and the tanoa used for mixing and drink- ing kava.

It must have crossed other people’s minds that after the ceremony, not immediately but some days or weeks later, if there was a funeral what would happen?

Money would have to be used by those who were enticed to have their personal artefacts burnt to buy these items, which are certainly not cheap.

But the main point here is Fiji’s rich cultural heritage with its unique traditions could one day be jeopardised.

Tourism is good for the country because it improves infrastructure, provides better facilities including that for leisure and an improved lifestyle for Fijians, especially those whose traditional land is being used for tourism developments.

Interaction with tourists creates a new culture and new jobs.

However, this could result in people copying lifestyles of tourists, which in some cases could result in the loss of native customs and traditions.

While development of tourist attractions, including major resorts, may mean huge investments into the country which then has a multiplier effect, the effect on the environment could prove disastrous if not monitored.

Overdevelopment, most times, comes at the cost of nature.

This development could also mean displacing families to areas where it is already packed with people and could result in increased transportation problems, more noise, improper waste disposal, pollution overload in the area and disturbance to the ecological balance of the region.

The tourism industry contributes the highest to Fiji’s GDP and to the economic growth of a country through factors such as industrialisation, education, advanced technology, higher number of qualified professionals and the opening up of foreign markets.

We need tourism and invite investors openly, but simply ask that they not become over-engrossed with their plans which could lead to degradation of the environment.

Fiji Sun Instagram
Subscribe-to-Newspaper
error: