NATION

Anti-Corruption Will Be Part Of Fiji Schools Curriculum

Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said people in Fiji had a tendency to ask for favours because they belonged to the same area or came from the same province and civil servants felt pressured to oblige.
30 Jul 2019 12:31
Anti-Corruption Will Be Part Of Fiji Schools Curriculum
From left: FICAC Youth Ambassadors Nereo Seruliwaliwa and Waisea Nabobo.

Attorney-General and Minister for Economy Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum says having a curriculum on anti-corruption in schools will raise a generation of Fijians who will stand up to corruption in society.

He made the remarks during the launch of the National Anti-Corruption Curriculum (NACC) at Suvavou House in Suva yesterday.

NACC, a first of its kind in the Pacific, is the brainchild of the Fiji Independent Commission Against Corruption (FICAC), developed in collaboration with the Ministry of Education (MOE).

NACC will be taught as part of the English and Social Studies curriculum in primary schools and as part of English, Social Science, History and Accounting in secondary schools.

Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said people in Fiji had a tendency to ask for favours because they belonged to the same area or came from the same province and civil servants felt pressured to oblige.

He said what made it worse was that Fijians are unable to say “no” to such requests.

“Corruption is like cancer, it eats away at your society and country,” he said.

“Many projects do not get off the ground because of corruption and ordinary people miss out on those opportunities.

“Taxpayers funds, donor funds have been completely gone awash in the hands of one or two people, so, we have to be very upright about it.”

He said the curriculum would create awareness among children who would not only identify corrupt practices, but alert others of it.

“Once they become adults themselves, they will have it in their minds and hearts that corruption is wrong,” Mr Sayed-Khaiyum said.

“They will have that natural instinct.”

FICAC yesterday also announced its Anti-Corruption Youth Ambassador Programme, which recognises acts of integrity by young people.

Its first ambassadors are Waisea Nabobo and Nereo Seruliwaliwa, who were awarded for their honesty. The Nasinu Muslim College students found and returned a wallet containing $1,000.

FICAC Acting Deputy Commissioner Rashmi Aslam said the two youths as ambassadors would inspire many young minds to do the right thing.

“That is exactly the kind of behavior we would like to cultivate with the curriculum,” Mr Aslam said.

Minister for Education Rosy Akbar also attended the launch with Education Permanent Secretary Alison Burchell.

Edited by Percy Kean

Feedback: neelam.prasad@fijisun.com.fj



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