Feature

Fiji Urged to Adopt And Ratify Kigali Amendment

PIDF highlighted its support for the adoption and ratification of the amendment noting that there are viable and cost-effective industrial alternatives to Hydrofluorocarbons.
17 Jan 2020 14:20
Fiji Urged to Adopt And Ratify Kigali Amendment
Members of the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and Defence (from left:) Lenora Qereqeretabua, Dr Salik Govind, Pacific Island Development Forum Secretary General Ambassador Solo Mara, Committee Chair Alexander O’Connor, Committee Member Anare Jale and PIDF Programme Manager Mark Borg at the Parliament’s Committee Room yesterday. Photo: Fonua Talei

Fiji needs to continue the momentum it set during its 23rd Conference of Parties (COP23) leadership in Bonn, Germany, a parliamentary committee heard yesterday. It can do so by adopting and ratifying the Kigali amendment to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that deplete the Ozone Layer.

The amendment, which came into force on January 1, 2019 aims to achieve more than 80 per cent worldwide reduction in the manufacture and consumption of Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) by 2047.

HFCs are greenhouse gases with extremely high warming properties that are commonly used in refrigerators and air conditioning units.

The earlier countries ratify the amendment the earlier the implementation process takes place making the phase down process easier.

Pacific Islands Development Forum (PIDF) programme manager Mark Borg said Fiji needed to stop importing HFC used products now and start bringing in products that adhere to the amended protocol.

As a region advocating to limit temperature rise to 1.5 degree Celsius, implementation of the Kigali Amendment could make the required difference.

“Currently there are 91 states that have ratified the Kigali Amendment. Pacific Island countries that are already parties are Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Niue, Palau, Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu,” Mr Borg said.

“As Fiji legislates to restrict import of HFCs it could also take into consideration the great recent advances in energy efficiency and renewable energy technology.”

Business owners and consumers should also be incentivised according to Mr Borg to speed up the HFC phase-out process.

He added that the Government could also consider tax breaks as an incentive.

PIDF secretary-general Ambassador Solo Mara said a challenge faced by member countries when signing such conventions was the lack of scientific capacity to monitor and address issues.

In its submission to the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and Defence yesterday, PIDF highlighted its support for the adoption and ratification of the amendment noting that there were viable and cost-effective industrial alternatives to HFCs.

“This is in line with Fiji’s and other Pacific Island countries’ position in regards to decreasing Greenhouse Gas Emissions that are causing climate change.”

“Fiji has taken a global leadership position on climate change with its chairing of the 23rd United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of the Parties and needs to continue showing leadership in this area, considering the adverse impact that climate change will have on the communities of this country, particularly those most vulnerable.”

Edited by Percy Kean

Feedbackfonua.talei@fijisun.com.fj



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