Feature

Kadavu Man Invests In Dog Training, Starts Business For School Leavers

“The initiative behind this is to lead the young people in combating crime and sexual abuse in Fiji,” he said.
26 Jul 2020 14:55
Kadavu Man Invests In Dog Training, Starts Business For School Leavers
A K9 dog training session.

Discipline is key for a one-month-old dog training business in Nadi.

West Africa-based K9 dog trainer and owner of Positive K9 Training Obedience Fiji, Waisea Salele, said the business provided school leavers with overseas job opportunities.

“The initiative behind this is to lead the young people in combating crime and sexual abuse in Fiji,” he said.

“This training is not only for dog discipline, but for the trainer’s discipline as well. Parents have told me the changes they have seen in the young boys I have trained for the first week.

Screenshot 2020-07-26 at 2.52.01 PM“Disciplined dogs are trained by disciplined owners.”

He said with the help of former workmates, Samu Baravilala and Ratu Malani Ilisoni, he was able to establish his company.

“Now this company has been fully registered. What is left now is to pay for my licence to the Ministry of Defence so I can conduct the second stage of this training.”

Mr Salele is from Kadavu and was part of the Fiji Police Force dog unit for seven years, before he received favourable K9 dog training contracts overseas.

“In 2007, I was offered a K9 contract in Afghanistan, so I resigned from the Police Force,” he said.

The 46-year-old said after his contract in Iraq, he returned to Fiji and was paid by a couple to train their dog.

“While in Fiji, I got a contract again in Australia and joined a school of Guard Dog Training in Australia. From there, I went through a lot of enlightening experiences in dog handling.

“I came back to Fiji and after two months here, I received a phone call for a contract in West Africa in Mali.”

Mr Salele returned to Fiji in February this year for his annual leave, and has been in the country ever since because of the COVID-19 pandemic travel restrictions.

“I have trained eight boys with dogs. The training starts off with an hour session in the morning and another hour in the afternoon until everything runs well.”

The father of three said the work had helped him to support his family and serve his country.

“When I started this job in Fiji, my wages was 76 cents an hour. The company I am working for now, I am paid $4000 FJD a month. During this pandemic, they still pay me half of that amount,” he said.

“Over the years, I have been supporting my family back home. I know this is a good investment not only for my family, but for youths in Fiji, who will receive certificates in K9 Dog training.”

Edited by Ivamere Nataro

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