NATION

Gloves Not Used When Giving COVID-19 Vaccine Jab

“When we’re wearing gloves, it interrupts the technique; sometimes the gloves is not the right size and we’re focused on adjusting it rather than on the technique."
13 Mar 2021 12:04
Gloves Not Used When Giving COVID-19 Vaccine Jab
Labasa Hospital laboratory supervisor Makarita Baleinadogo gets vaccinated by staff nurse Meenal Devi at the Labasa Hospital conference room on March 11, 2021. Photo: Laisa Lui

Gloves are not used while administering the COVID-19 vaccine. This was revealed by World Health Organisation (WHO) Support for COVID Vaccine officer, Sangita Sharma, who said nurses use sanitiser instead of the gloves, as it is distracting.

She also revealed that nurses are well trained to carry out the vaccines as they had undergone Expanded Programme Immunisation (EPI) training.

“At the EPI training we teach nurses on the right technique, right skills, the right way of vaccinating,” Ms Sharma said.

“The training is mandatory as it also teaches which type of syringe is used, how to do withdrawal as the same needle goes inside a person, we have to maintain the standard of operation.

“When we’re wearing gloves, it interrupts the technique; sometimes the gloves is not the right size and we’re focused on adjusting it rather than on the technique.

“We sanitise our hands before and after every individual we vaccinate and then we avoid wearing gloves.

“Unless there’s a person coming with an infection or skin disease then we have to prioritise the use the gloves, but not full time wearing gloves.

“This is our day-to-day routine on carrying out the vaccination programme to babies.

“Even in health facilities, we’re not strengthening the wearing of gloves to vaccinate.”

Ms Sharma said in that way they keep their hands clean and maintain hygiene on a daily basis.

She added that needles are used only once.

“Most nurses on the ground know the technique and how to carry out the vaccination,” she said..

Process

Ms Sharma also said the rolling out of the vaccination begins with a registration process.

“The registration is uploaded online, and a consent form is filled that they agree to be vaccinated or not, after vaccinating we give out an appointment card with the date of the second dose of the vaccine.

“We want to maintain the efficacy of the vaccine, which is dose one and dose two of the vaccine equals 100 per cent.

“We also want to maintain that coverage to maintain the efficacy of the vaccine as dose one alone doesn’t give the efficacy, it has to go with dose two- that is another important area

“We need to know the next vaccination date for them which takes between to 10 to 12 weeks.

“We’re making the most maximum date which is 12 weeks, which means they will be coming in for the second dose at the end of the month of May,” she said.

Ms Sharma said the same micro plan that was carried out for rolling out dose one of the vaccine would be followed with the second dose.

Edited by Jonathan Bryce

Feedback: laisa.kabulevu@fijisun.com.fj



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