NEWS

Renewed Hope For Kidney Patients With New Dialysis Centre

In Fiji, estimates show that somewhere between 13 to 14 per cent of the population have some degree of kidney disease.
19 Mar 2021 10:19
Renewed Hope For Kidney Patients With New Dialysis Centre
Staff Nurse Sonam Prasad assist Neelam Staff Nurse Sonam Prasad assist Neelam Nadani at the Fiji National Kidney Centre following its opening at Nadera in Suva on March 18, 2021. Photo: Ronald KumarNadani Fiji National Kidney centre following the opening at Nadera in Suva on March 18, 2021. Photo: Ronald Kumar.

Lilam Nandani, who undergoing kidney dialysis, says the opening of the new Fiji National Kidney Centre is a source of renewed hope for her.

Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama yesterday opened the new state-of-the-art facility in Nadera.

It has the capacity to provide treatment for 40 patients with 180 dialysis sessions a week.

Diagnosed with Stage five Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) in 2018, Ms Nandani said paying for dialysis treatments had always been a struggle for her family.

“By the end of the month our subsidised dialysis treatment cost will be effective,” she said.

“This I know will give me and the many other patients here new hope.

“We pay less than what we used to.”

A kidney dialysis at facilities in Fiji costs about $200 per session.

At the centre, the patients are currently paying $150 but this will be subsidised further and by the end of the month they will pay $75, she said.

“When it is subsidised, I would be able to get two sessions in a week,” Ms Nandani said.

More than a treatment centre

Mr Bainimarama said: “This is more than a treatment centre.

“It is the new beating heart of our holistic response to addressing the painful and deadly scourge of kidney disease in our society.

“This centre will work to create awareness of the causes of kidney disease and how Fijians can decrease the likelihood of contracting the disease.”

The facility

Head Nephrologist of the facility Dr Anis Ta’eed said as of last week the new centre was able to dialyse seven patients.

“We anticipate that this will increase over the coming weeks,” he said.

“We have 10 dialysis machines in the facility including two in the isolation rooms.

“In terms of the dialysis centre, we need to do it in a steady process to ensure that everything works correctly and it’s all smooth running.”

He said diabetes was the most common cause of Kidney diseases in Fiji and second most common was high blood pressure.

“So, a lot of the work that we do in terms of preventing kidney disease progressing is ensuring that blood pressure is well controlled, diabetes is well controlled and we have a dietary intervention programme,” he said.

“In Fiji, estimates show that somewhere between 13 to 14 per cent of the population have some degree of kidney disease.

“And up to 90 per cent of the population do not know they are living with kidney disease until a later stage because kidney disease does not present symptoms until a later stage.”

Feedback: inoke.rabonu@fijisun.com.fj

 

 



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