NEWS

Tourism, A Backup For Sugar Industry In Labasa, Says Local Hotelier

“We need to prepare so that when all this is over it will generate revenue equivalent to the revenue generated by the sugar industry in Labasa.
18 Jun 2021 10:30
Tourism, A Backup For Sugar Industry In Labasa, Says Local Hotelier
The $1 million expansion Northwinds Hotel Plaza project in Labasa by hotelier Paul Jaduram. Photo: Laisa Lui

The way forward in Labasa is to expand the tourism industry as a backup for the sugar industry.

This was the sentiment by Labasa Tourism Association president Paul Jaduram while highlighting his ongoing $1 million expansion project at the Northwinds Hotel Plaza in the town.

He said people in Labasa needed to be optimistic about finding a solution to help generating more revenue.

The expansion plan is just behind the existing property.

 

The expansion consists of:

  • Fully air conditioned six deluxe rooms,
  • Two VIP rooms,
  • Staff quarters,
  • Laundry room
  • Ground floor to accomodate two large shops,
  • One food court that would sit 60-80 people with a bakery, coffee shop, Indian and Chinese cuisine, and a fast food outlet

Mr Jaduram said the extension started on March 15 and is optimistic to complete the project by October 15.

The hotelier is now faced with the challenge of unavailability of cement from the hardware shops.

“It is fortunate that all the shops will be fully occupied and with this expansion we will be employing 12 more people,” he said.

“Currently we have seven people and will employ 12 more.

“We need to prepare so that when all this is over it will generate revenue equivalent to the revenue generated by the sugar industry in Labasa.

“Tourism in Savusavu will also boom because it has its own port of entry and visitors will have to travel two hours to get to Labasa.

“It’s best that Labasa get its own port of entry for cruise ships to berth in because we have sought the government’s assistance on this matter since 1973.

“If one cruise ship comes in once a month with more than 2000 passengers, there will be 12 cruise ships in a year and this will bring in more revenue in reviving the economy.

“We can accommodate those 2000 visitors and villages, bus companies, restaurants, town shops will all benefit from it.

“Local villages can make crafts and sell at the same time display some traditional meke as entertainment for tourists and even lunches.

“There’s a lot that can be done and at the same time people can get employment and earn some money.

The 80-year old said he acquired the idea while travelling in a cruise ship in his younger years as a tourist from Fiji to London.

Feedbacklaisa.kabulevu@fijisun.com.fj

 

 



FS JAB DRIVE


Get updates from the Fiji Sun, handpicked and delivered to your inbox.


By entering your email address you're giving us permission to send you news and offers. You can opt-out at any time.


Total
Covid 19 - SPC
Subscribe-to-Newspaper
Fiji Sun Instagram
Subscribe-to-Newspaper